Smart Buildings

On average, people spend about 80% of their lives inside buildings—office buildings, schools, hospitals, and homes. Buildings represent the largest capital expenses for businesses, second only to employee salaries.

Property owners and managers are constantly seeking new ways to make buildings more efficient, sustainable, safer and more comfortable. The Internet of Things offers solutions to meet these goals while revolutionizing traditional building automation and management systems.

Buildings account for up to 70% of energy consumption in major cities—and 30% of greenhouse gas emissions globally. Smart buildings can reduce the carbon footprint.

By collecting data and making continuous adjustments, smart buildings address the goal of greater efficiency—while also getting other operational areas to work in concert.

The various systems of a building—fire protection, ventilation and climate control, lighting and video surveillance—do their jobs separately. But in a smart building, these systems feed into a central control and talk to each other via a low-power, wide-area network. For example, sensors that detect a lack of activity in vacant offices can inform lighting and temperature systems to dedicate less resources to those spaces, thus reducing energy waste.

Organizations that implement smart building technologies can not only reduce costs by an average of 15%, but also boost the bottom line by creating an environment that reduces energy waste and stimulates employee productivity.

Employee Comfort

Support employee performance and reduce time wasted. Help employees find free meeting rooms or an available workspace, and enable them to personalize lighting. Monitor air quality data in real time and receive alerts when conditions trend to unhealthy territory. Use occupancy insights to see where and how people prefer to work, opening your eyes to potential for energy and space savings, and efficiency gains.

Smart buildings can generate lots of data, constantly documenting in fine detail how the building has performed and where the greatest gains have been achieved. This provides a foundation for stronger building performance—what gets measured can ultimately be streamlined, and improved.

A Smart Building is a Green Building

Over 49% of a buildings energy consumption is in space heating alone. Part of any effective strategy for creating a carbon-neutral footprint involves the monitoring and controls necessary to effect change in our commercial buildings. Without the knowledge of where power is being used and the ability to optimize, few gains can be accomplished.

Intelligent “smart plugs” can be placed within any existing building infrastructure. No expensive networking or wiring is required, merely a new plug at a junction box to give facilities both reporting and the control to reduce energy use.

Organizations sometimes have a hard time determining the impact of energy saving improvements, which can create difficulties in getting decision makers to approve future investments. Having access to real-time energy data at a granular level (floor-level, system-level, equipment-level) can reveal the impact of those improvements with greater accuracy. With a better sense of the return on investment, businesses can start small with upgrades and easily build a business case for similar improvements that could be made to other facilities or enterprise-wide.

  • Reduce power consumption and costs
  • Optimize HVAC by occupancy
  • Gain control such as programmed shut offs, remote on/off, event based on/off for inactive plugs or lights
  • Gain detailed reports to see where energy wastage occurs

Benefits of Smart Buildings

Improved Efficiencies, Lower Operating Costs

Smart buildings continuously collect and analyze large amounts of data from around the building, simplifying key pieces of information, like how much energy the building is using at any point in time and what it’s costing. With this information, trends are identified and building optimization opportunities are uncovered. For example, presence sensors enable facility managers to assign cleaning staff only to spaces that have been used. Imagine a building that pre-cools spaces on hot days to avoid peak utility costs.

Reduced Energy Consumption

When room occupancy is monitored, heating and lighting systems can respond by providing light and heat only when employees are present. Machine learning can analyze past data and predict when it's needed and not needed, and set up schedules, constantly tweaking as it learns for optimal comfort yet minimal consumption.

Optimized Space Planning

Sensors help identify overused or underused areas in a smart building. Recommendations can be made for redesigning and optimizing spaces. Use insights from the data to create a workspace that meets your needs and lower real estate costs without compromising employee experience.

Predictive Maintenance

Building systems can routinely have unseen faults, such as reduced airflow due to clogged air filters. If these faults go undetected, systems can waste a considerable amount of energy and have a shorter life span. Smart buildings immediately detect these faults, detail why they occurred, and help you prioritize which issues to focus on first—ultimately empowering staff to spend less time putting out fires by preventing them to begin with.

More Comfortable, Productive Spaces

Smart buildings create a healthier, more productive, and more comfortable space for employees. With advanced climate and lighting controls, smart buildings can improve indoor air quality and lighting aesthetics. According to a World Green Building Council study, enhancing ventilation and indoor air quality can improve worker productivity by 11%, and enhancing lighting conditions can improve productivity by 23%.

Employee Engagement

When energy data is visualized and communicated, more people within an organization become aware of its impact on the bottom line. Informed employees are more likely to be mindful about their own impact on energy performance and costs.

HVAC

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Fire/Smoke Alarms

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Digital Signage

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Entrance Security

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Elevators

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Lighting

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Electrical Power

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Integrating Building Subsystems

IoT creates dynamic and intelligent cloud-based interoperable networks by connecting electrical, mechanical, and electro-mechanical systems and platforms. By communicating with each other, these systems can help monitor themselves and act when necessary (e.g. turn down air-conditioning or heating needs in a little-used area) to provide the data and analytics needed for facility managers to intelligently optimize performance and create smarter buildings.

The various systems of a building—fire protection, ventilation and climate control, lighting and video surveillance—do their jobs separately. 

But in a smart building, these systems feed into a central control and talk to each other via Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity. For example, sensors that detect a lack of activity in vacant offices can inform lighting and temperature systems to dedicate less resources to those spaces, thus cutting down on waste.

By collecting data and making continuous adjustments, smart buildings address the goal of greater efficiency—while also getting other operational areas to work in concert.

Smart buildings deliver efficiencies by unifying systems and producing analytics for the entire building, all available in a single cloud-based dashboard that can be used by everyone from the facilities level to the C-suite to see what’s going on within the building on a device level, on an energy use level, and on a system health and efficiencies level.

Smart buildings can also talk to one another. This marks a major step toward the goal of creating “microgrids” that stabilize primary grids, compensate for supply fluctuations and reduce overall energy demand. Or in a more straightforward connection, a smart building can curtail its energy consumption on days when its smart city power grid sends an alert that it’s near capacity.

We’re ready to answer your questions.

CityKinect